“Some dissenters refused to join the “We Adore Benito” chorus. The Nation reminded its readers that…”

“Some dissenters refused to join the “We Adore Benito” chorus. The Nation reminded its readers that Mussolini was not saving democracy but destroying it. Progressives of all stripes and various labor leaders denounced fascism. But their critical sentiments received little exposure in the U.S. corporate media.
As with Mussolini, so with Hitler. The press did not look too unkindly upon der Fuhrer’s Nazi dictatorship.

There was a strong “Give Adolph A Chance” contingent, some of it greased by Nazi money. In exchange for more positive coverage in the Hearst news- papers, for instance, the Nazis paid almost ten times the standard subscription rate for Hearsts INS wire service. In return, William Randolph Hearst instructed his correspondents in Germany to file friendly reports about Hitlers regime. Those who refused were transferred or fired. Hearst newspapers even opened their pages to occasional guest columns by prominent Nazi leaders like Alfred Rosenberg and Hermann Goring.

Michael Parenti, Blackshirts and Reds (1997)