Category: science

unexplainedthings: unexplainedthings: If you got fake boobies do they get hard in the cold? This…

unexplainedthings:

unexplainedthings:

If you got fake boobies do they get hard in the cold? This…

If you got fake boobies do they get hard in the cold? This is for science.

If you got fake boobies do they get hard in the cold? This is for science.

unexplained-events: In Hiroshima, there are p…

unexplained-events:

In Hiroshima, there are permanent shadows caused by the intensity of the blast from the bomb that was dropped. Nuclear bombs emit EM(electromagnetic) radiation which was absorbed by the people or objects that were in front of the radiation. So if they were far enough away from the blast, they wouldn’t have been incinerated, but still would have cast a shadow.

Since thermal radiation is light, and since light travels from a central point, everything in its path is burned except when there is something blocking it, so it creates this shadow effect. The surfaces behind the matter (the objects you see the shadows of) received much less radiation bleaching so there is a visible difference

earthstory: The boundary clay One of the dis…

earthstory:

The boundary clay

One of the distinct features of the boundary between the Cretaceous and the Tertiary (paleogene) in the geologic record is found in this photo. Sandwiched in the middle of this section, you see what is called the “boundary clay” layer.

66 million years ago at the end of the Cretaceous, a rocky asteroid hit the Earth off the shore of the Yucatan peninsula. Near the site of the impact, rocks were tossed around by enormous waves creating tsunami-caused deposits several meters thick in places like Cuba.

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Solar System

Offspring of Neanderthal and Denisovan identif…

Offspring of Neanderthal and Denisovan identified for first time: undefined

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how do i get the moon to notice me back

earthstory: Tracking Glacial Waters This is …

earthstory:

Tracking Glacial Waters

This is a photo taken by the Landsat 8 satellite showing the Mackenzie River Delta in northern Canada. The Mackenzie is the longest river in Canada and produces the second largest river delta on the Arctic Ocean. The watershed of this river includes territory far to the southeast, in areas of central Canada that were once covered by the great Laurentide Ice Sheet. This river, therefore, is one potential route for water out of the center of the continent, and new evidence suggests it could be an important one.

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Photo

Photo

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If size didn’t matter, Pluto would still be a planet.